Category : Health

Living / Health - 1 day ago

Avoiding excessive bleeding after childbirth (2)

Last week, we started to look at the causes of PPH, which is a major cause why our mothers die of childbirth disorders. In this week’s article, we will continue to examine the causes of PPH and thereafter, deal with how you as a healthcare consumer can help save the lives of our mothers from premature death. Rupture of the womb, tears of the neck of the womb and vagina may lead to the woman to bleed heavily. If not controlled urgently, the woman may lose her life. In addition, when the womb (uterus) inverts on itself or turn inwards, such that there is no opportunity for the womb to self-control the bleeding, PPH may become a major problem. There are often diseases that are associated with pregnancy and after childbirth, which may limit the ability of the body to take care of itself naturally. Example of this is high blood pressure and pre-eclampsia. When the disease has become so bad, the ability of the doctors to control the bleeding may be lost. Another tragedy that may befall a woman during labour or after childbirth is rupture of the womb itself. In a labour that is intense and prolonged beyond a reasonable period, the womb may burst open internally and the woman bleeds profusely. As I mentioned in earlier article, when bleeding occurs more than 24 hours after a childbirth,...

Living / Health - 1 day ago

Fruit juice can lower BP, says expert

Health and fitness consultant, Dr. Bisi Abiola, has said taking fruit juice can reduce high blood pressure (BP). She stated this during the monthly healthy living dialogue sponsored by Chi Limited. The fitness coach added that drinking a glass of fruit juice gives one the opportunity to get at least eight per cent of daily potassium, which neutralises sodium and helps to lower BP. “The overall amount of sodium and potassium in your diet affects your BP. Sodium makes it go up while potassium offsets sodium and helps to lower BP. Researches have shown that consuming more potassium reduces BP in people with hypertension; and this has huge benefit for consumers as long as they do not suffer from kidney disease. “Most of us only get about half of the recommended dietary allowance for potassium. What many people do not know is that taking a glass of orange juice allows you to get at least eight per cent of your daily potassium,” she stressed. While many hypertensive individuals resort to medication,  Abiola stated: “Medication is not the only way to control high BP, also known as hypertension. Lifestyle and diet also play an important role in managing such a health challenge.” According to her, fruit juices from trustworthy brands produce bioflavonoids, such as hesperidin, which functi...

Living / Health - 1 day ago

NSIA-LUTH model: Hope for cancer patients

With the recent inauguration of a world-class Advanced Cancer Treatment Centre at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) by President Muhammadu Buhari, Associate Editor ADEKUNLE YUSUF reports that the deal between LUTH and the Nigeria Sovereign Investment Authority (NSIA), which bankrolled the project, can serve as a model to tackle the huge infrastructure deficit bedeviling the sector Cancer has become a national scourge. Of the more than 8.8 million cancer deaths recorded yearly across the globe, Africa is estimated to contribute about 5.8 per cent, in addition to having a disproportionately higher per cent of inadequate cancer treatment facilities and higher incidence of cancer types with poor outcomes. Of this figure, Nigeria accounts for a staggering 80,000 cancer deaths yearly. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), over 100,000 people are diagnosed with cancer  yearly. On the average 240 Nigerians die daily or 10 Nigerians every hour from cancer. Research has revealed that more Nigerians are likely to die of cancer in the next seven years, with a gloomy projection that the world’s second leading cause of deaths is likely to kill more than malaria and HIV. The main reason for the deaths is not the prohibitive cost of accessing treatment; it is the dearth o...

Living / Health - 1 day ago

NAFDAC: ban on methyl bromide stays

The National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC) has warned the public, especially agro dealers, that the ban on methyl bromide as a fumigant for pest control still subsists. Methyl bromide is colourless, odourless, non-corrosive and non-flammable, but highly toxic to a broad spectrum of insects from egg to the adult stage. It is used as a fumigant in stored product pest management. NAFDAC, in a statement by its Director-General, Prof. Mojisola Adeyeye, said methyl bromide is a class I ozone, which depletes substance (ODS). It depletes the ozone layer due to the release of bromine atom upon the break down of the molecule. Methyl bromide is also a scheduled chemical under the Montreal protocol for substances that deplete the ozone layer and was placed on a phase-out procedure from 2001. Nigeria effected the phase-out of methyl bromide by January 2015 and since then, the product has not been permitted for importation, NADFAC warned. “Methyl bromide is an extremely toxic vapour. In humans, methyl bromide is readily absorbed through the lungs. Most problems occur as a result of inhalation. Methyl bromide is a dangerous cumulative poison. First symptoms often are due to damage to the nervous system, and may be delayed from 48 hours to, as long as several month...

Living / Health - 1 day ago

Fed Govt, USAID partner on low TB detection

The Federal Ministry of Health, in collaboration with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), has concluded plans to carry out a pilot intervention programme in Lagos and Kano states to address low tuberculosis (TB) detection. The Head of Advocacy Communication and Social Mobilisation (ACSM) unit of the National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Control Program (NTBLCP) in the ministry, Mrs. Itohowo Uko, made this known at a workshop in Nasarawa. She said the decision to choose Lagos and Kano was based on data and their urban areas. The programme is being funded by the USAID through the Breakthrough Action project to show the value it will add to the sector. “We decided to deviate from the conventional way to go into the communities to interact with them and understand the situation from the community members’ perspective; not just sitting in Abuja and developing messages that might not really speak to the needs of the people. “In Lagos, we will be working in Ajeromi and Badagry local government areas (LGAs) where they have high TB burden. We will also be working in two LGAs in Kano. The pilot is going to last for 12 weeks, after which we will do a survey to see what impact it has added. We will also take data from various DOTS centres to see the rate of TB reporti...

Living / Health - 2 days ago

Take aways from some challenges of 2018 (2)

   You must count yourself lucky if, without a doctor’s prescription, you easily recovered from the “bomb blast” of last Saturday. By “bomb blast”, I mean postponement last Saturday of the 2019 presidential election when the polity was in full agitation. I have learned since 1979 presidential election between Chief Obafemi Awolowo and Alhaji Shehu Shagari, which the Obasanjo military regime and the Supreme Court rigged in Shagari’s favour, to easily soar above shock waves of any heat wave, and move on with my life, unscathed, recognising that a people deserve the leaders they have.    Our religions warn us about this. But we pay no attention. Christianity says we would reap whatever we sow, including I believe, the votes we sow in poolling booths. Islam teaches that the creator is as near to us as the muscles of our necks and that our leaders, will come from our ranks.  I take this to mean that our leaders will be good to us if we ourselves are good people, and that they will be nasty to us if we are a nasty lot. So, all the noise of the ongoing election campaign about MR CLEAN and MR unclean or about MR honest or MR thief will end up in a leader that will tell us, if, as a nation, we are clean or unclean, honest or thieving. So, when I heard...

Living / Health - 2 days ago

Cancer biggest killer in Ibadan, says UCH CMD

The Chief Medical Director (CMD) University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Prof. Temitope Alonge, has revealed that cancer is the commonest cause of death in Ibadan, the Oyo State capital since 2015. Alonge disclosed this while reflecting on his eight-year tenure in an interaction with reporters in Ibadan. The Orthopedic surgeon explained that data generated from the hospital revealed that cancer has been the leading source of death in the hospital along with infections including HIV/AIDS, injuries and Cardiovascular diseases since 2015. To address the ugly trend, Alonge said the hospital acquired two 22-channel brachi-therapy machines able to treat the three commonest types of cancer. He added the machine can treat minimum of 50 patients a day. According to him, most of the infections are HIV/AIDS-related, dismissing the impression the killer virus has been largely stamped out as a ruse. He said the campaign against stigmatisation may have contributed to the spread of the virus again, as infected people live without stigma, get more comfortable but go round to infect unsuspecting members of the public. Alonge said he was leaving the position fulfilled because he succeeded largely in his dream of transforming the UCH. He added his goal was to build the people, build a system and...

Living / Health - 1 week ago

What’s new in the hair growth industry (Continued)

An Italian vascular surgeon, Dr Brotzu, serendipitously discovered the hair generating property of prostaglandin E1 and went on to produce a formula containing a prostaglandin analogue, DGLA, plus three other ingredients.  The Italian firm Fidia Pharma Group acquired the rights to manufacture this product as a hair growth lotion “Trinov”. The laboratory of Dr George Cotsarelis, a dermatologist at the University of Pennslyvania School Of Medicine published a scientific paper ‘Prostaglandin D2 Inhibits Hair Growth and Is Elevated in Bald Scalp of Men with Androgenetic Alopecia’ Sci Transl Med. 2012 Mar 21; 4(126): 126ra34). BecausePGD2, which is a natural chemical in the skin, in raised levels inhibits hair growth, PGD2 blockers became a topic of interest for reversing baldness.  The drug Setipiprant was originally developed by the company Actelion for asthma but did not have advantage over existing drugs for asthma.  The drug acts as a selective blocker of the prostaglandin D2 receptor 2 that can be taken by mouth and therefore easy to use.  The discovery of actions of prostaglandin D2 by George Cotsarelis led to further investigation of Setipiprant.  Presently, Allergan, an Irish pharmaceutical company, is producing Setipiprant for male pattern baldness. Dr George Cotsarelis, bei...

Living / Health - 1 week ago

Presidential Committee on drug abuse begins work

The Presidential Advisory Committee on Elimination of Drug Abuse (PACEDA)  has embarked on a mission to the Southwest. The committee, headed by the retired brigadier-General Muhammed Buba Marwa and wife of the Vice President, Mrs. Dolapo Osinbajo, Dolapo said the survey by the United Nations Office on Drug Control (UNODC) contains high prevalence of drug abuse. Speaking for the committee, Alhaji Abubakar Jimoh, the Director of Public Affairs in the National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC), said the report had showed that Nigeria has a national average of 14.4 per cent prevalence, which almost tripled the world average of 5.6 per cent. According to the report, Lagos State has the highest figure of 33 per cent followed by Oyo State with 22 per cent. Describing drug abuse menace as hydra-headed, Jimoh, however, said: “This was not insurmountable considering the star-studded composition of the Committee headed by General Marwa, whose antecedents in Lagos with his Operation Sweep and successful military career, are strong pointers to the fact that PACEDA is a serious-minded and achievement-oriented Committee. “I am very happy that General Marwa had accepted the gauntlet with the proposed launch of War Against Drug Abuse (WADA), which will further amplify a...

Living / Health - 1 week ago

50 years after, Lassa fever remains unstoppable

Fifty years after the first outbreak of Lassa fever, the disease still continues to claim lives. VINCENT IKUOMOLA writes on why the country may not be able to exterminate the virus. Lassa fever is an acute viral haemorrhagic illness that occurs in West Africa, after exposure to the urine or faeces of infected mastomys rats. More than 80 per cent of Lassa fever cases are rodent-to-human transmission. Person-to-person transmission also occurs in both community and health-care settings. It is one of the most ravaging diseases that have plagued the country, so recurrent that the disease seems to have become synonymous with Nigeria. Ironically, as the nation marks 50 years of the first discovery of the virus in a small town called Lassa in Borno State, there is an outbreak of the disease in some parts of the country. Though first outbreak of the disease was in the 1950s, the virus causing Lassa disease was not identified until 1969. The virus is a single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the arenaviridae Family. At the moment, there is no vaccine that protects against Lassa fever. Lassa fever is also a zoonotic disease, meaning that humans become infected from contact with infected animals. The animal reservoir, or host, of Lassa virus is a rodent of the genus mastomys, commonly known...

Living / Health - 1 week ago

‘Nigeria has highest rate of tuberculosis in Africa’

The National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Control Programme (NTBLCP) Department of the Federal Ministry of Health has said Nigeria has the highest number of people infected with tuberculosis (TB) in Africa. Its National Coordinator, Dr. Adebola Lawason, made  this known at a workshop organised in collaboration with Breakthrough Action and United States Agency for International Development (USAID) for health reporters in Nasarawa State. She said Nigeria has the sixth highest burden of TB patients globally and the first in Africa. Lawason, represented by Mrs. O. Shofowora, said tuberculosis is one of the top 10 causes of deaths, and that Nigeria is classified among 30 countries with high burden of TB, Multi-Drug Resistant TB (MDR-TB) and TB/HIV. “Tuberculosis is caused by a bacterium known as mycobacterium tuberculosis, which affects mostly the lungs. It is called pulmonary tuberculosis. Our goal is to achieve a 50 per cent reduction in the TB prevalence rate and a 75 per cent reduction in TB mortality rate; that is, excluding those that are co-infected with HIV by 2025,” she said. According to a 2017 global report by the World Health Organisation (WHO), it is estimated that two out of every 1,000 Nigerians have TB yearly. This is an estimated figure; the actual figure might be scarier...

Living / Health - 1 week ago

Avoiding excessive bleeding after childbirth (1)

Pregnancy is a natural human occurrence. Intending mothers look forward to having their children and becoming mothers. In general, pregnancy and motherhood are occasions that should just occur normally. However, in some occasions, the joy of the family and even of the newborn may not be so joyful because of unfortunate events that follow pregnancy and motherhood. Motherhood is meant to be a time of joy and happiness for the mother and child. But, about 814 mothers die for every 100,000 of overall mothers in every year in Nigeria. Put in some more salient perspective, just a little short of 60,000 women die of pregnancy-related disorders in Nigeria every year. Doctors call these deaths, maternal mortality rates. Nigeria is in the top 10 of such high and sad deaths behind war-torn Somalia and Yemen. Even if the pregnancy had gone uneventful, the days and months following childbirth may still pose a serious threat to the lives and happiness of the mother. Thus, in this article and the ones to follow, we will take a look at maternal mortality (specifically, death of mother that is due to bleeding as relating to pregnancy) and how you and the healthcare team can help reduce the scourge of our mothers, sisters, aunties, daughters and wives dying of pregnancy-related disorders: what is...

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